What is the truth?
Whose "facts" do you believe?
Everyone has opinions on everything - just ask them.
Everyone's rights are being infringed upon - just watch the news.

A series of historical events and examples to give a different perspective than commonly heard today.
Scroll down through each era.

The final era of this 6 part feature is now posted...

#1
From the Greatest Generation...

From:
LEON W. JOHNSON
Brigadier General, USA
Chief, Personnel Services Division
23 March 1946
Mrs. Therese T. Detlefsen 124 East Street
Manning, Iowa

To:
Dear Mrs. Detlefsen: In regard to First Lieutenant Heinz W. Detlefsen, these records indicate that your son was killed on 8 November 1944, when his aircraft a P-51 (Mustang) fighter plane crashed at Bersenbrueck, twenty-one miles north of Osnabruck, Germany. These records further indicate that his body was recovered and buried at Bersenbrueck on 9 November 1944, at 8:00 A.M. in the Cemetery. Lieutenant Detlefsen rests in grave 118, row 2.

After receiving his Wings at Williams Air Field, Arizona, in November 1943, Heinz received his combat training at Santa Ana, California, in the P-38 fighter plane.
April 1, 1944, his squadron, the 435th, was sent to England and became part of the 479th Fighter Group. He completed 260 hours of combat leaving only 40 hours for completion of his required hours over enemy territory.
At the time of his death, November 8, 1944, he was flying a Mustang. From the book which describes the activities of the 479th Fighter Group, the following quote is taken: "Lts. H.W. Detlefsen and T.V. Smith, 435th pilots, had a mid-air collision during a cross-over in the Lubeck (Germany) area and did not return."
Lt. Detlefsen was awarded the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the Distinguished Flying Cross, plus the rank of 1st Lieutenant.
Heinz's remains were later removed from the Bersenbrueck, Germany, cemetery and moved to the Margraten U.S. Military Cemetery near Vaal, Holland, as seen in these three pictures of the crosses.
His wife, the former Elnor Vannote, taught in the Manning High School from 1939 to 1940.

These cemetery photos were taken in February 2017 by Peter S. of Holland, who, at my request, graciously offered to take high resolution digital pictures and e-mail them to me.

Heinz Detlefsen, son of first generation German immigrants Hans and Therese (Thede) Detlefsen, was born July 11, 1920, in Manning.
Max Detlefsen, also son of Hans and Therese, was born September 22, 1915, in Manning. He graduated from Manning High School in 1933 and worked for Dultmeier Manufacturing.
Max then attended Coyne Electric School in Chicago for two years. He returned home and worked for the Manning Municipal Light Company.
In 1941 he was drafted into the United States Army, where he served for four and a half years, teaching munitions and demolition to recruits at Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri.
On December 27, 1942, Max was united in marriage with Marjorie Smith in Williamsburg, Iowa. The couple met in Manning, where Marge was a Home Economics teacher.
After his honorable discharge from the Army in 1945 they lived in Williamsburg for a short time before moving to Manning. Max then worked for Manning Municipal Light Company for several years before buying Schelldorf Electric Shop in 1948, renaming the business Detlefsen Electric.
Max and Marge had two children; daughter, Ann, and son, John. Max semi-retired when John took over the business in 1981.
Max was a charter member of the Manning Rotary Club, a member of the American Legion, and a volunteer with the Manning Fire Department. With Lyle Arp, he built L & M Bowl in 1960.

#2
To the Manning Pioneer Generation...
WWI, Iowa Governor William Harding's The Babel Proclamation May 14, 1918.
"Only English is legal in public or private schools, in public conversations, on trains, over the telephone, at all meetings, and in all religious services."
By permission of Governor Harding we are again able to preach German sermons. But the sermon must first be rendered in English and everyone who wants to hear it in German must first hear it in English. Every second Sunday in German but depends that those who would rather hear the German will also be present on those Sundays when only English is preached.
Pastor John Ansorge - July 21, 1918, entry in the official Lutheran Church record book

In response to local accusations against the Lutheran Church, whose members were of German ancestry or direct German immigrants, the local pastor provided these facts.

August 22, 1918 - letter to the editor by Pastor Johann Ansorge, Lutheran pastor in Manning
The American Lutheran Church Is A Loyal Church

Some have looked askance at our Church because a good portion of her members are of German descent. But German blood does not make for disloyalty.

Do you know that during the Civil War 48 generals, who were Germans by birth, fought on the side of the Union? They include some of the most distinguished Generals of the great Civil War. Had it not been for the Germans, both Missouri and Maryland would have been lost to the Union." These are the words of General Sherman, spoken in the House lately.

The writer is proud of the fact that his grandfather, under a German general, fought to retain Missouri for the Union.

Why Roosevelt said the other day in the Kansas City Star: "I also have German blood in my veins." And you will not say that Roosevelt has a drop of disloyal blood in his veins. Why should he, who has English or Irish or French blood in his veins, love this country more? The Lutheran Church has no interest whatever in any language; her business is to preach the Gospel according to the Master's commission. "Go ye into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every creature." She is preaching the Gospel in 17 different languages in this country. Language has nothing to do with loyalty.

If the Lutheran Church were disloyal, do you believe that the Government would open to us her army camps and forts? Pastors of our own Lutheran Synod are working in over 260 army camps, and are in the service of the government overseas as chaplains.

The 35,000 of Lutheran boys who have gone into the service of their country are being spiritually cared for by our own Lutheran ministers, our congregations cheerfully and willingly have taken upon themselves the enormous expense which this work entails. We are erecting chapels and comfort huts in the various camps. And the government is rendering us every aid and encouragement, because it recognizes that our boys need the spiritual aid of the Church. Would the government do this if the Lutheran Church were disloyal? No, the Lutheran Church is loyal and is rendering her country a real service.

Can the same be said of those who slander the Lutheran Church?
Johann Ansorge

Ill feeling developed between those who either immigrated from Germany or were American born citizens of German ancestry and those residents of Manning who were of non-German ancestry.
Threats were made, and at one point, it was rumored that Manning's German Savings Bank was to be painted yellow. The bank directors held a hasty meeting and changed the name to the Iowa State Savings Bank.

Peter Rix, owner/publisher of the German newspaper Der Manning Herold, bought the Manning Monitor, combined the two plants, and discontinued the German paper.

Some families changed their surnames to "less German" sounding, such as Anton to Antone.
The German singing group Der Manning Liederkranz, stopped singing and meeting during both WWI & WWII.

The U.S. declared war against Germany April 6, 1917, and by June, over 175,000 American troops were in France for training.
It was a gala day in Manning April 20, 1917, when ten young men left Manning to enlist in the service of their country in the World War. Patriotism ran high and the men were escorted to the depot by the band and an enthusiastic crowd of fellow townsmen carrying flags. They left amidst the cheers and tears of the people.
The youngest of these men, 17 year old Albert Dethlefs, did not return alive.

When the United States entered the war, there was no draft but May 18, 1917, Congress passed a selective service act, and within days all men between the ages of 21 and 31 had to register.
The effects of the draft were felt in many homes; in one call alone, 98 men from Carroll County - nearly half with Manning addresses - were put into uniform.


Bill, Herman, Harry, Herbert
Hans and Magdalena (Buhmann) Claussen, both German immigrants had a 4-star flag in their window signifying that four of their sons, Harry, Herman, William and Herbert were serving in the American Expeditionary Forces.

Before the peace agreements were signed in July 1921, the "War to End War" had taken the lives of 3578 young Iowa men; eight were from the Manning area.

Over 330 men from the Manning area served during WWI.


August 28, 1919
Eight Manning men did not return home alive: Albert Dethlefs, Emil Ewoldt, William Wulf, Fred Passick, Louie Rowedder, Arthur Stang, Bernhardt Stuhr, Julius Vinke.

PROUD OF RECORD - Carroll Herald 1918
Citizens of Manning can feel proud of the number of volunteer young men who have joined the colors. Should other towns furnish a number in proposition there would be no need of drafting or conscription. The young men go to all parts of the world, and perhaps in a few months they will be scattered thousands of miles apart. Here's hoping that a year from now all will be able to return to Manning feeling that the year had been a profitable and pleasant one by them.

You'll give it to Manning, yes, Manning with its heavy percent of German population, when it comes to showing the best phase of loyalty to this government. Manning several days ago had sent 29 boys to the country's army. That's better evidence of patriotism than putting up the flag or engaging in heated debate. Manning, you may stand at the head of the class. published by the Carroll Herald 1918.

Some Manning men of German ancestry would have potentially fought against some of their relatives in Germany during WWI and WWII...no specific cases are known where actual direct fighting between relatives occurred where a Manning soldier was shooting at a German soldier from the same family line, but this would have been on the minds of those who fought for both sides - that they could kill an uncle, cousin, or brother who was fighting for the "other side."


Joseph Brandt served in the German Army before immigrating to the United States in 1913.
His grandsons, Bert and Joe served in the U.S. military.

Jurgen Hinz served in the German Army in 1895 before immigrating to the United States in 1902.
His grandsons, Larry Genzen served in the Iowa National Guard, Dale Hinz served in the US Marines, and Gary Gruhn in the US Army.

Today, there is only one person living in Manning with both a German relative and American relative who served in the military during WWI. They were uncles of Gerhardt Theodore Voge who will be 95 in 2017.
Ironically, Gerhardt Theodore Voge is named after those two uncles - Gerhardt Lamp, who served for the U.S. Army and Theodore Voge, who served for the German Army during WWI.

Throughout the 1800s and intensifying in the latter half of the 19th century, ensuing political instability, restrictive religious laws and deteriorating economic conditions in Europe began to fuel the largest mass human migration in the history of the world, with 1907 being the record for this era with 1.25 million immigrants.
From 1855 to 1890 approximately eight million immigrants, mostly from Northern and Western Europe, came to the United States.

#3
To those who saved the Union and freed the slaves...
Grand Army of the Republic - McPherson Post, Manning Veterans
Halsey D. Atherton, H.W. Bailey, J.G. Beal, Frank Blair, William J. Blair, Addison W. Blakeslee, L. Putnam Brigham, John Campbell, George W. Coe, Elisha Cole, Andrew J. Corbin, Nathaniel G. Dillingham, Cornelius Dunnick, P.A. Emery, C.M. Failing, James Foster, Horace M. "Hod" Free, Julius W. Gardner, A.C. Gaylord, James Halford, James L. Hall, David Hamm, Merrill Hutchins, Charles "Carl" Knapp, Carl Koepke, Benjamin H. Lathrop, Francis Leonard, Uriah Lenhart, Gilbert Moore, Joseph Moore, Jacob L. Nickum, John Noble, Samuel B. Parrott, John Parker, J.O. Pattison, Henry J. Peters, E.A. Pickett, Silas Priest, Joshua Rogers, Joseph Sawtell, Morgan Spencer, George Stocker, Harvey Stocker, Donald W. Sutherland, Thomas Tarpy, Martin V. Tate, Selden Whitcher, S.L. Wilson, Alexander Young

All but two of these Civil War Veterans lived in Manning/area.
Sawtell & G. Moore never lived in Manning but have direct Manning connections.
Gladys (Sawtell) Schmidt is the great-granddaughter of Joseph Sawtell.
Gilbert Moore died at Andersonville prison. He was the father of Joseph Moore and great-grandfather of Charles Moore who both lived in the Manning area.

Union statistics - which vary more or less among historians and military officials
2.2 million served for the Union - 360,000 death toll - around 330,000 were caucasion and 30,000 were black


Emiline and James Hall


Joseph Moore 1914


Donald Sutherland


John Parker


Silas Priest


Martin Tate


Henry Peters - Medal of Honor


Joseph Sawtell - Civil War diary


Civil War members in newspaper article June 5, 1913

The following are the Manning Veterans who saw that Memorial Day was properly observed. It was their pleasure to assist in decorating the graves of their departed comrades. Following are the Veterans in the picture, S.B. Parrott, Donald W. Sutherland, A.C. Peters, John L. Hall, John Parker, Cornelius Dunnick; except H.D. Atherton and Nat Dillingham.
Note there are ribbons on the men's coats in the picture above
Below is that ribbon

Manning McPherson Post #33
January 10, 1883 - McPherson Post G.A.R., is organized at Manning with the following charter officers: Commander, Seldon E. Whitcher; S.V.C., Joseph Moore; J.V.C. , George Stocker; Officer of the Day, Henry Stocker; Adjuvant, C. M. Failing.

James Birdseye McPherson in whose honor the Manning post was named

#4
To those who built Iowa and truly knew what hard work was...


1921 Alfred Nissen, cross-cultivating corn that was planted using the wire-check method.


1920 Joe Herbers, cross-cultivating corn that was planted using the wire-check method.


Loading manure by hand


Picking corn by hand

1913 - local farmers were hired to use their teams of horses & mules and slip scrapers to help build the grade of the Milwaukee RR.

circa 1917 Alfred Ehrichs owned/operated this corn sheller, made by the Joliet Manufacturing Co. At the top of the corn pile are Chris Ehrichs, Louie Ehrichs, August Ehrichs, and Carl Otto


Feeding hogs by hand


Threshing oats


John Kienast plowing with horses


1938 Roy Struve working with his FFA steer


1938 Amos Kusel working with his FFA sow


Loading loose hay
Hugo Ahrendsen on top of hay
Amos Kusel top of ladder then Melvin Kusel then Alice Ahrendsen
August Kusel leaning against hayrack


1942 filling loose hay in the barn on a 400 acre farm about 2 miles southwest of Botna


July 1942 Jasper "Jap" Ward trucker
Billy Meggers in door
Eddie Meggers holding the horse
Bill Gruhn holding the hay rope
Lester Gruhn and Elmer Fischer on truck
Andy Jansen heading toward the barn
Russell unknown - little boy
Horse's name is Charlie
Andy Jansen is brother to Alma Jansen Gruhn - Alma's husband was William Gruhn


"Plowing bee" from the Handlos collection.
When a farmer died or was injured, the neighbors pitched in and helped.


August 1948 bailing hay on the Kusel farm - Gene Ehrichs on the hayrack.


1963 "recycling" tearing down a barn on the Parker farm, that was built using wooden pegs in the timbers.

Using the large timbers and salvaged lumber from the original barn to build the new one.


Building another barn, all by hand.


Unloading ear corn into the corn crib


Ernest Kuhn with a full load of ear corn - hand picked


Milking the cow


Radeleff family shelling corn


Shelling corn


Claus Nielsen, Sr. harness shop in Manning...one among several harness shops.

Radeleff ice business

Lou Ohm with Bob Radeleff driving


Radeleff ice business


Outhouse at a country school
If you are 70 and older and were rural you probably used one of these.

No heat, no air conditioning, no air fresheners - just the air slots at the top of the structure.
They were generally on the north side of the house which made for very quick trips during the winter.
Many times they had to scoop through deep drifts of snow to get there...

The days of square hay bales.

1949 Melvin Kusel, August Kusel, Amos Kusel, Hugo Ahrendsen


Amos & Melvin Kusel getting ready to paint the barn September 1951


June 1950 next to the Kusel farm - RR workers repairing the Great Western track after a major flood


Martin Benischek & Dewey Schilling after loading hay on the truck by hand.


Dale Vollstedt & Paul Vollstedt after loading hay on the cart pulled by "Cutie" on the Emil Opperman farm.

A common scene on farms June 1950

Dorothy Kusel feeding her chickens

A common scene in homes during the 1960s and before

The kitchen cook stove on the left not only was used to make breakfast and cook meals during the day, it also was used to heat the kitchen. Corn cobs and chunks of wood were generally the source for fuel.

A common scene on farms December 1961

Barry & Amos Kusel haying the stock cows.

A common mode of transportation during the early 1900s

Louie Ehrichs with his horse & buggy.

#5
To the bedrock of the community...


1902 German Lutheran Church - first structure on Second Street

This church was moved and turned into a home - now located at 31 Sue Street


1921 Zion Lutheran - second structure on Second Street

1963 Zion Lutheran - third structure South Center Street


Calvary Baptist Church today

Roof burned off the Calvary Baptist Church


First Christian Church on the corner of Second and May Streets 1887 to 1920


United Methodist Church on Second Street 1883

United Methodist Church on Second Street


First Presbyterian Church on Second Street 1883

First Presbyterian Church 2005

First Presbyterian Church 2005


The first Catholic Church facing Third Street 1889

Taken in 1969 Sacred Heart Church built in 1916

Sacred Heart Church built in 1956

Sacred Heart Church 2005


The first Trinity Lutheran Church in Lincoln Township 1894

The second Trinity Lutheran Church was built in 1901

It was destroyed on March 24, 1913 by a tornado and the same structure was rebuilt by the fall of 1913.

These WWI soldiers who attended Trinity posed on the steps in 1918.

On June 6, 2006, the church was moved to the Manning Heritage Park

1895 census of Manning

Total number of inhabitants .................. 1144
Males ....................................................... 582
Persons over 18 years of age................. 653
Persons 5 to 18 years of age ................. 347
Persons under 5 years of age ................ 156
Single....................................................... 654
Married.................................................... 490
Widowed.................................................... 48
Divorced...................................................... 7

Born in Iowa ..........................................588
Born in Germany .................................. 246
Born in Canada ....................................... 15
Born in Ireland ......................................... 9
Born in England ..................................... 10
Born in Denmark ..................................... 7
Born in Norway ........................................ 3
Born in Austria ........................................ 4
Lutheran ............................................... 451
Christian ............................................... 115
Presbyterian ........................................... 96
Methodist .............................................. 135
Catholic .................................................. 73
Congregational ....................................... 14
Universalist .............................................. 5
Episcopal .................................................. 2
Baptist ...................................................... 5
Evangelical................................................ 3
United Brethern ....................................... 7
Church of England .................................... 2
No religious belief ................................. 242
Old soldiers ............................................. 24
Births ....................................................... 32
Deaths ..................................................... 13
Subject to military duty ........................... 176
Voters ..................................................... 288
Not naturalized ..........................................16
Foreign born between the ages of 6 and 17 ........... 7

#6
To the Entitlement Generation...


kneeling during the National Anthem


kneeling during the National Anthem


Foreign flags flying during a protest in the United States


Stomping on the US flag during a protest


"Brave" photographers taking pictures of a burning US flag


Destroying property on a college campus while protesting other people's Freedom of Speech -
people who happen to have a different viewpoint than they have.


Freedom of Expression and Speech???


Freedom of Expression and Speech by wiping the flag with your butt???


"Goose-stepping" by some modern day foreign armies


"Goose-stepping" by some modern day foreign armies


"Goose-stepping" by Nazi Germany


Disrespect on every level and to every extreme and justified by those who feel the need to hold the United States of America at fault with just about anything they can think of.

Remember the era #5 above showing the Churches of Manning.
Normally I wouldn't give the Entitlement generation space on my web page for their venom but in this case I think it is necessary to show the extent of how low some people will go because they think they have the right to voice their opinions about everything - even when it has absolutely nothing to do with them or affects them one way or the other - referring to the video of moving the Trinity Church to Manning...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfXm2eJxXII
Tangogonzo 5 years ago
@OakPark11MileRd
There is only one color in Manning.

David 5 years ago
Ridiculous.

Michael Lee 5 years ago
I wish it would of toppled :(. Depressing it didn't.

Hippotoast 7 years ago
They found a shit load of alter boys buried underneath it.

Moose Kay 7 years ago
They couldent smell jesus

CreatorAdriaan 8 years ago
lol thats no church thats a chapel. Those crazy americans with there cheap prefab buildings.
Why moving somthing that was only there for 100 years? Make it 300 and it would have some value.

Hippotoast 8 years ago
I detest religion and truly appreciate it for what it really is a disgusting fallacy, but i just love this freaking song.

Green Silver9 years ago
Rednecks are weird, I seen the movies. Incestious homo's... right strange bunch if you ask me. So what did ya do wiv the graves then, did ya dig em up and take em wiv ya?

normalnorman41 9 years ago
i would have blown the f##ker to bits

asdf 9 years ago
god only exists int he minds of human beings. he imaginary, lets move on as humans and drop this shit its silly---- press thumbs down lol sry for thinking

John Doe 9 years ago
yeah how much money from that churches patrons did the church suck out of them to get it moved?

GueroMuerto 9 years ago
FAKE!!! The religion, that is.

Lee Mason 9 years ago
Why go to all the trouble. All they had to do was to ask Benny Hinn, Pat Robertson, Billy Graham, Paul Crouch. George Bush,. etc. to ask god to move it!

Roysito 9 years ago
first of all...
why did they move that church???
i mean!!! it's like if you spend 2000 dollars on something useless just cuz you have the money...

Now some people would say to just ignore these individuals...they are just the fringe.
Normally I would agree but I think it is time for the majority of people in the US who have been silent for decades and who love their country to stand up and peacefully speak up - against this type of destructive narrative that is so intertwined in society today.

John F. Kennedy "Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country." January 20, 1961


I guess this is where some of the "country hicks," referred to in the diatribe listed above, once lived.
This is how some of the Pioneers of this area lived. I'll guarantee they did not whine and complain -
they had to work hard just to survive...


WWII was a nation-wide effort - EVERYONE, including kids did their part for the war effort -
here you see them collecting scraps for the war effort.


Students proudly raised the US flag every morning during the school week at the old Manning High School.


Something you don't see any more on school property.

1973 Gun saftey, cleaning and refinishing class at Manning High School

As a kid I remember almost every boy in school had a pocket knife...
Those in high school and old enough to drive and were hunters had their guns mounted on the racks of their pickup rear windows while parked next to the school.
The boys in the gun safety class walked right into school with their guns.
No one was ever shot by a gun or seriously hurt from a pocket knife in school.
There were no locked doors - kids could come and go and for years we had a Manning Campus.
Today, not only are all outside doors locked but they lock the classroom doors. Security cameras are everywhere.
Why is it that when the Nativity scene was displayed on school grounds and knives and guns were brought right into school by students that no one was hurt? - now we have something similar to a prison system, BUT the good people are locked up...
With all of these safety measures - Are we better off and safer now???

Maybe, we as a society need to reflect back through history and reconsider some, if not all, of those so-called culturally positive and politically correct changes that have occurred over the last 40 years.


One last response:
The very first negative comment about moving the Trinity Church in the diatribe above is "There is only one color in Manning."

Let me educate that ignorant person...
During the 1870s through the early 1900s, the largest wave of immigrants came to the United States - predominantly from Europe.
Between 1850 and 1930, about 5 million Germans immigrated to the United States, peaking between 1881 and 1885 when a million Germans settled primarily in the Midwest, with Iowa receiving the largest percentage of these immigrants of all the states in the US.

At first immigrants of English descent started moving west across the Prairie during the 1860s and 1870s to where Manning is now located. Manning was incorporated in 1881 and this is when German immigrants started moving in. They did not move to the southern parts of the US or stay in the Northeastern parts of the US that were already populated and had existing businesses...
These early Manning residents wanted to start their own trades here in the US. By the fall of 1881, Manning grew from a few buildings on Main Street to businesses on both sides of the street, from north to south.
Farmers were already here, too, with more moving in to build the community into an agricultural force never seen before (the Midwest breadbasket of the world).

In less than a decade - Manning (like so many other small Midwest towns) became a self-supporting community.

Yes, "Manning was WHITE" - but not because the citizens thought they were better than other people...they did not have time for petty beliefs...they had to work hard every day of their lives just to survive. There were no government safety nets, no programs to help the helpless, just the Pioneer Spirit to survive.
Over 50 Civil War Veterans had moved to Manning during this time - they were part of that early generation of Americans who helped save the Union and free the slaves.
The other citizens of German ancestry immigrated to US and then to Manning after the Civil War was over, and long after the slave trade era during early US history.

During WWI & WWII around 1000 Manning area citizens (many of whom were of German ancestry) served their country - 24 who paid the ultimate price with their lives defending this country.

So anyone who accuses the people of Manning in the past of being prejudice needs to consider all of the sacrifices they made as Pioneers who built up the Midwest and who fought and died to help preserve the rights for everyone.

Did/does prejudice exist in the Manning community - YES - but no different than any other community or race or creed, who are all part of the imperfect human existence and has just as much evil and untoward tendencies towards other people who are different from them.

So, even with all of the faults the Manning community and the US community as a whole has, I'm proud of what our ancestors and the Pioneers gave us, and because of the sacrifices they made - everyone living in the US today has a privileged life.
We ALL have no clue as to how good we have it!!!


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