Do you miss our grocery store?
OR, did you just drive out of town to "save money?"
Are you currently still driving out of town to get groceries?
We are very fortunate to have a Dollar Store, so we can at least get the basic groceries...
BUT I miss the fresh produce and meat and much larger supply of items...
You say the grocery store didn't have "fresh" products - maybe it was because you did not patronize it enough.
We purchased 99% of our groceries locally...now if I want fresh produce and meat I'll have to drive out of town.

Hopefully once this pandemic lessens and we get back to some normalcy, we'll work together as a community to get a grocery store again.

Manning had a grocery store right away in 1881.
We've had grocery stores throughout Manning's history...WWI & Spanish Influenza, Great Depression, WWII - up until 2020.


I like to show history but this is one historical event I'm ashamed to have to show.


January 14, 2020, shortly before the store closed


Fortunately many Manning people put personal thoughts toward helping others...
October 22, 2019


Just some of the youth who were able to get experience being employed...
I hate to think that we will now have to go to another community to put on fundraisers like this!

From the "History of Manning 1898" book
Pre-1900 view looking north on Main Street.
View from roughly where the south end of the Manning Plaza now stands.

Manning's Growth.

The first buildings constructed on the land where Manning now stands were a farm house, stable and granaries built by J. A. Jefferies, who owned and farmed the land before a portion of it was bought for a town site. The house was located where the Park Hotel now stands.

Up to August 2nd 1881, there was little or nothing in the way of building, that would indicate the site of a future city. Three and a half months later we find, what was but a short time before a common farm yard, now a thriving little city supporting the following business firms and enterprises, as chronicled in the Manning Monitor, Vol. 1, No. 1, bearing the date, November 17, 1881. Entering the town from the north on the North-western, the attention of the visitor is attracted by the extensive yard the company has laid out and lengthy switches; the substantial section house and out built for the maintenance of the road and the accommodation of business, while the depot, which is a building two stories high, furnishes good accommodation for the traveling public and a comfortable home for the agent, E. C. Wilbur and his family.

The first upon the list of business houses is the grain ware house of Bell & Winter, standing on the south siding near the depot. In the same locality will be found the lumber yards of the Green Bay Lumber Company and that of John Dierks. The third lumber yard is that of Wolfe & Nodle on the west side of Main Street. On lot 6, Block 3, is located the Garfield House built and operated by W. M. Tingle & Son. This building is 18 by 48 feet and two stories high, with a basement.

Adjoining this is the millinery store of Mrs. G. M. Dailey. Next door is E. B. Wilson the harness maker and saddler. The largest building in town is that belonging to Callison who occupies the front for tonsorial and bath rooms while the rear, which is 24 by 60 feet, is used as a hall.
The next building to Callisin's, after a vacant lot, is the Farmers and Traders Bank, in the rear of which building is the Monitor office. On the corner of Main and Third Streets, in the same block, is the restaurant and confectionary of A. Young.

Across Third Street south is the hardware store of Wetherill & Morsh. Adjoining them is the general store of Callamore & Priest. Heinzman Bros. & Moody will soon occupy the large store building adjoining Callamore & Priest. Whealen Bros. was the first firm on the ground coming with their grocery stock about the first of April. Next comes Stocker's Meat Market which is joined on the opposite side by Fred Gestenberg who runs the loudest saloon in the business and has the largest building in the place. He also runs a lunch room in connection with the saloon. Passing a vacant lot you find the Post Office which is kept by Seth Smith. Next to the Post Office is McQuaid while a new building adjoining on the south and belonging to L. M. Freelove will be occupied as a restaurant. The last building on this block, and facing Fourth and Main Streets, is a two story frame structure belonging to Engleman. Crossing Fourth Street south, we step into Shunters Meat Market adjoining which is the Farmers Home kept by Fred Huber. The machine shop is on the south of this. Next to this is the paint shop of Burley & Brown.

Funk Bros. have a nice stock of clothing and furnishing goods, Hoffmann & Schoop have just opened a stock of dry goods and groceries on one side of their building, and furniture and sewing machines on the other side. Tidd & Foote run an extensive blacksmithing business on the corner of Main and Fifth Streets.

Returning to the east side of Main Street, we have, first the general store of Benson & Vauhn. Chapman Bros., next door, have just arrived with a splendid assortment of dry goods. Barber & Turner are building a large drugstore opposite the Post Office. Martin & Launderville, hardware, is next in line with Lathrop's restaurant adjoining. Next come the saloons of W. E. Heitman and John Marks. Dr. T. S. McKenna has an office on Main Street opposite Callimore & Priest. Mr. Barber is erecting a fine two story building on the corner of Main and Third Streets. On the opposite side of Third Street is the drug store of L. S. Knox adjoining which is the boarding house and bakery of Miles Woolman.

Mr. Emery has a nice store room near Hensley's boarding house. L. M. Conkling will open a broom factory, where at least two men will be employed. The livery barns of Laughery & Arnold and Gardner & Wilson are on Third Street, and Gaylord's Feed Stable is at the foot of Main Street. Dr. G. M. Barber has located here in the practice of his profession. W. B. Hockett and W.B. Gardner have drug stocks. The law firms are E.B. Blazer and H.S. Fisher.


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