What do you do on a hot Sunday afternoon?
I can drive around Manning nearly every day and find someone volunteering.
Now most of these volunteers don't want their pictures taken...they are humble and just want to go about their community efforts quietly and they don't think what they do is all that special or unique.
BUT I think we need to show more of the volunteers and what they do.

Without all of the volunteers in Manning, we wouldn't have the exceptional quality of life that we see every day in our little town.
Most of these volunteers also donate financial support to various aspects and projects in the community.
Lots of times you'll see "anonymous" donor listed with various projects...this is because they are modest and just want to support the community quietly.
Even though I'm running around at some point nearly every day in Manning, I'm only able to catch just a very small percentage of the volunteerism that goes on, and much of it is behind the scenes where I don't see it or am able to capture it.

The best way to THANK the volunteers it to be a volunteer yourself...so much more can get done and in a timely basis when there are extra volunteers around to help with things.
This past Sunday, August 23, I was in Manning taking pictures of another project Gene Steffes is working on, when I noticed someone watering the young trees planted at the Trestle Park...so I went over to investigate.


Sheryl Dammann watering the trees during our summer drought.
Rick Dammann with his recently purchased tanker truck that he purchased from the Templeton Fire Department.

Rick wanted a vehicle with a mount on front for a blade to move snow in the winter. He also uses the tanker for various things and something he initially had not anticipated...he uses the tanker to hose down and cool the hogs on a hot day after they load them into his semi-trailer.

Rick told me they have to refill this 200 gallon tanker 5 times to water all of the trees in Trestle Park.

So the next time you see Rick or Sheryl - tell them thanks for helping take care of the trees.


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